Facts about dating violence

Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime.Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.Intimate partner violence affects teenagers and young adults (ages 16-24) more than any other age group.

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For more info on this important subject, check out these additional resources: [2]Grunbaum JA, Kann L, Kinchen S, et al. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2003.

Relationship violence can start early in a young person’s life.

A CDC Report found among victims of contact sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, nearly 23% of females and 14% of males first experienced some form of violence by that partner before age 18. Unhealthy, abusive, or violent relationships can have short- and long-term negative effects on a developing teen.

Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to: Additionally, youth who are victims of dating violence in high school are at higher risk for victimization during college.

Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults, and the media.

All too often these examples suggest that violence in a relationship is normal, but violence is never acceptable. The risk of having unhealthy relationships increases for teens who: Communicating with your partner, managing uncomfortable emotions like anger and jealousy, and treating others with respect are a few ways to keep relationships healthy and nonviolent.Teen dating violence is a serious problem affecting adolescents across the nation, and it is an issue that often goes overlooked or unrecognized.February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness month, and we’re joining the cause to get the word out about what teenagers, parents, teachers, and community members can do to be aware of and prevent teen dating violence.Below are just a few: Teen dating violence is widespread with serious long-term and short-term effects.Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2015.Being able to tell the difference between healthy, unhealthy, and abusive relationships can be more difficult than you would think.

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