Three assumptions of radiometric dating

Rubidium-Strontium and Uranium-Lead also has problems of the same kind.Potassium, Rubidium and Uranium salts are highly soluble.

three assumptions of radiometric dating-70

A particular isotope of a particular element is called a nuclide. That is, at some point in time, an atom of such a nuclide will undergo radioactive decay and spontaneously transform into a different nuclide.

This transformation may be accomplished in a number of different ways, including alpha decay (emission of alpha particles) and beta decay (electron emission, positron emission, or electron capture).

Among the best-known techniques are radiocarbon dating, potassium–argon dating and uranium–lead dating.

By allowing the establishment of geological timescales, it provides a significant source of information about the ages of fossils and the deduced rates of evolutionary change.

We believe that since evolutionists expect certain rocks to yield dates that agree with their theory, no laboratory will publish dates that are wildly out of whack, or they wouldn’t get paid for producing a result that would be hotly contested as experimental error.

Woodmorappe shows that even the published results are enough to render the method as unreliable.All ordinary matter is made up of combinations of chemical elements, each with its own atomic number, indicating the number of protons in the atomic nucleus.Additionally, elements may exist in different isotopes, with each isotope of an element differing in the number of neutrons in the nucleus. John Woodmorappe’s books are advertised elsewhere on my web site.These books contain an exhaustive study of radiometric dates that do not fit the results evolutionists expect.Therefore, since sedimentary rock is the only kind of rock that bears fossils, a relative date is estimated by the position of a sedimentary rock in relation to an igneous outflow.

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