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A., KDITOR OF TUSSER'S " FIVE HUNDRED POINTS OF GOOD HUSBANDRY.' 'A ( ; ( id LONDON : PUBLISHED FOE THE EARLY ENGLISH TEXT SOCIETY, BY N. He must have been possessed also of considerable learning, for those times, to have been enabled to render his Author so correctly as he generally does ; and his success in reproducing a Prose writer in a Poetic dress indicates some literary taste as well as leisure.

The translator occasionally speaks in his own person, in parentheses, and in the Prologues and Epilogues, and though he does not thus help us in determining directly who he was and where he lived, he affords us abundant evidence that he was a religious and devout man.

The grammatical peculiar- ities lead to this conclusion ; the Stanza adopted was a favourite one with the great Poet in his early Canterbury Tales ; and in our text expressions and turns of thought frequently occur, which may justify the surmise that the translator, whoever he I VI PREFACE.

The form and structure of the language point decidedly to a period little subsequent to the age of Chaucer.

Yery possibly he may have been a member of one of the Eeligious Houses in Colchester, or the neighbourhood ; but this is only conjecture, founded upon the known facts that gardening was a favourite pursuit of the inmates of these houses, and Palladius was held in repute amongst them.

any clue by which we may hope to discover traces of his name, position, or history: stat nominis umbra.

Some of the grammatical forms ordinarily employed by this writer shall be appended, by which the Chaucerian reader will be enabled to see at once the similarity referred to.

was, had recently read and admired Chaucer's wonderful poem, and was led to an unconscious and humble imitation of his verse.

He trusts that in these directions it will render suffi- cient aid to the philologist, in pursuing his interesting investi- gations, to justify the labour and expense which have been bestowed upon it. I WOULD first venture a remark on the great variety of the spelling. "And therupon doo stones handfull grete " (155/181). " Til it be hony fatte and thicke iche dele " (205/516).

It is not only that the present participle is written some- times with an i, sometimes with a y, sometimes with a final e, sometimes without it ; that the past participle sometimes has the t or y prefixed, though oftener not ; that the infinitive appears now with the suffix en or ene, and now without it : but the same word, without any apparent reason, is represented in every possible variety of form. " And stere it until hony thick it renne " (185/189).

But admit England would yeeld none so strong and pleasant Wines as are desired (as I am fully perswaded it would), yet is it worth the triall and travaile to have Wines of our owne, though they be the smaller ; and therefore I thought it not meet to leave out of my booke the ordering and trimming of Vines." I would remark, in confirmation of Barnaby Googe's state- ment, that, in an old map of Colchester, I have seen vines depicted in the streets ; and in the Corporation Bolls, preserved amongst the Colchester Records, we find that in the 3rd & 4th Richard II., a sufficient piece of land was granted to place three stulps (spores, or spars) to support a certain vine opposite the house of one Clement, a dyer in North Street : and " in x PREFACE. Foot in the plural occurs regularly in its modern form feet, but when it signifies a measure of length, it is for the most part written footes, e.g. There are some rare examples of the plural in e : I can only call to mind kynde, 13/335 ; stede = places in 183/127 ; and pigge in 100/1086. The genitive singular ends most frequently in es, or s only, as : Hienes *fcywie=Hiena J s skin, 180/43. Generations libertee= liberty of generation, 130/724. There is a peculiar use of the adjectives great, small, etc., which is worthy of attention.

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